Everyday Heroes- Zul’s Story

Posted on

I can’t honestly say what my biggest obstacle with PCOS was because I still feel like I haven’t overcome it. I still live with it. I term it as a lifelong syndrome. I know it’s not life-threatening and won’t kill you in a few months but if you’re not careful, it can alter your life completely.

With PCOS, you can develop some critical illnesses. PCOS stands for Polycystic ovary syndrome.
Actually, with PCOS one of my biggest challenges was getting diagnosed properly. The most important thing to understand about PCOS is that it’s a spectrum and it ranges from really severe to mild cases. If I were to rate my obstacles, I will have to say, finding a doctor/medical response to my PCOS was the biggest obstacle I faced.

In 2015, before my diagnosis, I did a pelvic scan as part of a pre-employment medical exam and the sonographer had commented that everything looked good and there was absolutely nothing to worry about. Fast forward to 2017 when I got my diagnosis, I was shocked to hear I had cysts in my ovaries when barely two years ago, I was given the all-clear! This was the beginning of a rollercoaster ride as the diagnosis completely changed my life.

I changed hospitals 3 times, partly because I suffered infertility as a result of PCOS.
The issue with my journey was that the doctors tended to focus more on my infertility issues than to take time to educate me on PCOS and the new lifestyle I would have to adapt to manage it. There was no mention of potential weight gain, hair growth, painful periods or hormonal acne. I had to take the initiative and conduct research to aid my journey. I joined several support groups and I collated the information to guide the conversations with my doctors.

I make sure to mention that I have an underlying condition when receiving treatment from doctors or medicine from pharmacists.
Knowing that I have to make little changes to get big results is something I carry with me everywhere.

Knowing that with PCOS, all my actions have consequences; other people can eat cheese or normal bread without worrying but I have to be conscious of the foods I eat so I wouldn’t compound my issues further.

What I’ve learned so far with PCOS, is that when you don’t have all or most of the symptoms, it doesn’t mean you don’t have PCOS. It is a spectrum of things and it can differ greatly from woman to woman. Please endeavor to get regular check-ups.
With PCOS, you can develop some critical illnesses. PCOS stands for Polycystic ovary syndrome.
Actually, with PCOS one of my biggest challenges was getting diagnosed properly.

The most important thing to understand about PCOS is that it’s a spectrum and it ranges from really severe to mild cases. If I were to rate my obstacles, I will have to say, finding a doctor/medical response to my PCOS was the biggest obstacle I faced. I make sure to mention that I have an underlying condition when receiving treatment from doctors or medicine from pharmacists.
Knowing that I have to make little changes to get big results is something I carry with me everywhere.

Knowing that with PCOS, all my actions have consequences; other people can eat cheese or normal bread without worrying but I have to be conscious of the foods I eat so I wouldn’t compound my issues further. What I’ve learned so far with PCOS, is that when you don’t have all or most of the symptoms, it doesn’t mean you don’t have PCOS. It is a spectrum of things and it can differ greatly from woman to woman. Please endeavor to get regular check-ups.

0 Comments

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.

%d bloggers like this: